The real stakes of the Greek vote

The Greeks should stop being so selfish. Why are they voting on this referendum based on what they think will be best for their economy? Don't they understand how their vote will impact legions of armchair (or chaired) economists and political scientists?
Let's say they vote yes, accept the northern european ultimatum, and Greek society proves resilient enough to muddle through the cuts and austerity. Great. They will have conceded to the neoconservative enemy the last bastion of left-wing orthodoxy left in the Northern/Western hemispheres. They will have on their hands the conversational blood of millions of wearers of Che Guevara t-shirts,  local organizers of italian Feste Dell'Unità, and pretty much the entirety of french society without a hungarian last name.
If instead they vote no, and reject Das Deutsche Diktat, they could recklessly end up understanding the incredible luck they just had, clean up their act, and push through the much needed reforms. In one stroke, they would pulverize the argument for strict enforcement of sovereign debt stipulations, and proven wrong the collected groupthink of an endless array of golf club cocktail parties, Republican fundraising luncheons, and moralized and moralizing intellectual descendants of John Calvin.
Vote yes or no, the Greeks need to stop thinking about their own future, and understand the momentous consequences that their decision will have on the told-you-so scorekeeping of millions of people. People who until last Wednesday thought the biggest problem faced by Greece was treacherous hunchbacks guiding Persian troops along the flanks of their Thermopylae position.

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